Quick Answer: What Is Poetry According To Aristotle’S View?

What does Aristotle say about the origin of poetry?

According to Aristotle, poetry originated in the human soul from the “instinct of imitation” and “harmony.” …

Aristotle argued that second of all, poetry springs from our need for harmony.

Next, there is the instinct for ‘harmony’ and rhythm, meters…

(The entire section contains 302 words.).

How does Aristotle defend poetry?

Plato condemned poetry on moral, intellectual and emotional grounds. Aristotle takes up the objections of Plato one by one, and justifies poetry morally, emotionally and intellectually. He is the first to use the term Katharsis in connection with tragedy, and this part of the Poetics is highly original and moving.

What is Aristotle’s concept of tragedy?

“Tragedy,” says Aristotle, “is an imitation [mimēsis] of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude…through pity and fear effecting the proper purgation [catharsis] of these emotions.” Ambiguous means may be employed, Aristotle maintains in contrast to Plato, to a virtuous and purifying end.

How did Aristotle argue in favor of the poets?

On the contrary, Aristotle advocated poetry as it is mimetic in nature. According to him, poetry is an imitation of an action and his tool of enquiry is neither philosophical nor moral. He examines poetry as a piece of art and not as a book of preaching or teaching.

What is Aristotle’s objection to the theory of mimesis?

Aristotle’s Objection to the Theory of Mimesis Aristotle believes that there is natural pleasure in imitation which is an in-born instinct in men. It is this pleasure in imitation that enables the child to learn his earliest lessons in speech and conduct from those around him, because there is a pleasure in doing so.

What is poetry according to Aristotle?

He defines poetry as an art that imitates: “imitation . . . is one instinct of our nature” and “the objects of imitation are men in action.” He considers “Comedy . . . an imitation of characters of a lower type;” tragedy is “an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude;” Aristotle …

What are the four various kinds of poetry mentioned by Aristotle?

Poetry, as Aristotle defines it, includes epic poetry, tragedy, comedy, dithyrambic poetry, and music (specifically of flute, and lyre). What differentiates these kinds of poetry is the nature of their ‘imitation.

Is the finest form of poetry according to Aristotle?

Thus, he identifies four possible branches of poetry upon a hierarchy as follows: tragedy, comedy, epic, and the lampoon. For the purpose of defining the poet, Aristotle begins with the finest form of poetry. … This, he says, is the result of the inclusion of spoken words in tragedy, which is performed.

Why is Aristotle’s Poetics important?

Aristotle begins by declaring poetics a distinct eld of inquiry (methodos) that encompasses questions about the nature of poetry, its “kinds” or genres, the e ects each genre can produce, the essentials of a well-constructed plot, the constitutive parts of each genre, as well as unspeci ed related topics.

What are the three modes of imitation as suggested by Aristotle?

The remainder of Book I is devoted to a discussion of the different media of imitation; Book II treats the objects of imitation and Book III discusses the mode of imitation. The three basic media which Aristotle recognizes are rhythm, language, and harmony.

When did Aristotle write poetics?

CriticaLink | Aristotle: Poetics | Overview Like many important documents in the history of philosophy and literary theory, Aristotle’s Poetics, composed around 330 BCE, was most likely preserved in the form of students’ lecture notes.

How did Aristotle defend imitation and poetry?

Aristotle proclaimed that the poet imitates “the ideal reality,” not the mere shadow of things. Thus, the poet does not copy the external world. He creates something new according to his own “idea” of it. … He provided a strong defense of poetry by blowing off Plato’s theory of Poetic Imitation.

How does Aristotle view literature and poetry?

Aristotle proposes to study poetry by analyzing its constitutive parts and then drawing general conclusions. The portion of the Poetics that survives discusses mainly tragedy and epic poetry. … He defines poetry as the mimetic, or imitative, use of language, rhythm, and harmony, separately or in combination.